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Among two national political parties, the Bharatiya Janata Party won 3 seats, while the Indian National Congress did not win any.

The AAP has its origins in the India Against Corruption movement organised by Anna Hazare, Arvind Kejriwal and some other social activists who had been involved in Team Anna, a strand of the anti-corruption movement for a Jan Lokpal Bill that had gained momentum in India during 20.

Aam Aadmi Party (AAP, English: Common Man's Party) is an Indian political party, formally launched on 26 November 2012, and is currently the ruling party of the National Capital Territory of Delhi.

It came into existence following differences between the activists Arvind Kejriwal and Anna Hazare regarding whether or not to politicise the popular India Against Corruption movement that had been demanding a Jan Lokpal Bill since 2011.

In November 2013, a sting operation conducted by Media Sarkar, alleged that several leaders of AAP, including Kumar Vishwas and Shazia Ilmi had agreed to extend their support to some people seeking assistance with land deals and other financial arrangements in return for donations in cash to AAP.

AAP emerged as the second-largest party in Delhi winning 28 of the 70 Assembly seats; the Bharatiya Janata Party as the single-largest party won 31 while its ally Shiromani Akali Dal won 1, Indian National Congress won 8 and two were won by others.

The party made its electoral debut in the 2013 Delhi Legislative Assembly election, where it emerged as the second-largest party, winning 28 of the 70 seats.

The party fielded 434 candidates in the 2014 Indian general election, in which it did not expect to do well, it recognised that its support was based primarily in urban areas and that different strategies might be required for regions such as Uttar Pradesh where caste-based politics are the norm.

The party pointed out that its funding was limited and that there were too many demands for local visits from Kejriwal, the intention was to field candidates in large numbers to maximise the likelihood of recognition as a national party by the Election Commission.

Hazare and Kejriwal agreed on 19 September 2012 that their differences regarding a role in politics were irreconcilable.

Kejriwal had support from some anti-corruption movement activists, such as Prashant Bhushan and Shanti Bhushan, but was opposed by others such as Kiran Bedi and Santosh Hegde.

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